30+ best e-mail campaigns and why we loved them

Thousands of marketers around the world share the same mission: they want to send the best marketing campaigns by email.

While there are many ways to measure the success of your email campaign, it's crucial to get the message out of your subscribers and make them feel good to their subscribers.

Therefore, in this article, we have chosen not to focus on the raw numbers. We publish them regularly in our e-mail marketing report.

Instead, we decided to look at the visual aspects of marketing emails sent by brands and companies from various sectors.

To find inspiring examples of marketing emails, we decided to tap into our own inboxes and contact other online marketers.

If you are one of them, thank you very much for your contribution and for sharing your thoughts – this has been a world for us!

What you are about to see, aside from the best e-mail campaigns, is that there is certainly a truth behind the saying, beauty is in the eyes of the viewer.

But before you start exploring the examples we've put together for you, here's an article that will help you send email campaigns of this type in no time: Good Email Marketing Practices for 2019

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More than 30 best e-mail campaigns

Below, we have included more than 30 examples of e-mail campaigns, along with additional information on:
who sent them,
what's the email campaign about,
and why they are so good .

Feel free to book this article for later, as we will expand this list to include new examples of marketing emails that have stolen our hearts.

1. The New York Times

What :

Recommended weekly recipes from their NYT Cooking subscription.

Why:

I read this email without fail, every week. And I rarely do the recipes presented in the raids. Why? The photographs are gorgeous and the long copy, written brilliantly by Sam Sifton, editor of the New York Times, is informative, conversational and personal. He shares anecdotes about his life, news likely to concern one of the presented recipes and cooking tips, each week.

I like the idea of ​​how two supposed "dead and dying psychics" – newspapers and emails – unite to offer something totally modern, shareable and sustainable.

Abby Hehemann, Product Marketing Manager at GetResponse

2. Patagonia

What:

This is the first email you receive after you sign up on their mailing list.

Why:

A sequence of email integration should set expectations. This email does it really well. For starters, you have the free shipping information at the top, which is more or less an indication of the amount that Patagonia would like you to spend in the store.

The title of the e-mail is inviting. They then tell readers what kind of content they are sending, although they do not mention the frequency. Just as importantly, you have the refund policy at the bottom. It defines customer expectations, which is crucial for an e-commerce store.

The only thing I would change in the copy is the section "our mission". Most people are in favor of saving the planet. This statement without context means nothing to the reader. This is a missed opportunity. The introductory email is the perfect time to talk about what sets the company apart. Just a sentence or two with a link to the site, maybe even a button below, would have done the trick.

Nico Prins, founder of the launching area

3. MVMT

What:

This is an email campaign asking MVMT customers to submit their video content and celebrate the brand's anniversary together.

Why:

I am a big fan of MVMT and here is another example of a fantastic email campaign among so many senders.

The message begins well, with an intriguing line of purpose: "This time we became viral …"

They immediately caught my eye and made me click. I wanted to know why they had become viral and I really hoped it was not a smart way to show that their prices had dropped.

I was not disappointed.

What I saw is a newsletter containing an animated video containing many exciting images and a short message explaining how they asked their fans to celebrate their brand's birthday together.

The animated GIF and the message led to an exciting film showing how brand followers live their lives in their own way.

The film combining images of their clients, breathtaking images and captivating music gave me goosebumps!

At the time of writing this article, this video has been viewed more than 22,000 times, 1,000 mentions I like and nearly 500 comments on YouTube – there is talk of commitment, huh?

In fact, it's this kind of user-generated content that forced me to buy one of their watches a few years ago.

4. Offensive of charm

What:

This is a welcome email received after your registration, which allows you to earn a free lifetime subscription to the writing course.

Why:

Just read! When was the last time you received an email with an evil laugh in the subject? It's original, it's witty and you remember it because you have never received an email like this I participated in a contest where I have to compete against others, and the copy encourages it rather than avoiding it. It jokingly reminds me of what is to be won if I win. Then, kindly remind me to join the Facebook group and to participate more than I am already.

Phil Forbes, marketing manager at Packhelp

5. Statwing (acquired by Qualtrics)

What:

Cold email to sell a partnership.

Why:

I get tons of cold e-mails and I erase most of them immediately. But I've actually answered this one because it contains everything that a cold email should have:

External evidence: Y Combinator finance and other trusted companies already partners
A clear benefit, including a figure: "Users tell us that they analyze survey data about 5 times faster …"
Personalization beyond my first name: he actually looked at Survey Anyplace's reporting capabilities and even links to them in email
Clear ask for next step (phone call)
The tone and format of the email are very informal, just like it had been sent by someone I already know.

Stefan Debois, Founder and CEO of Survey Anyplace

7. Casper

What:

Here is an example of an email campaign sent at daylight saving time.

Why:

One of the things I enjoy about email campaigns is their creativity.

Balances or flash campaigns no longer impress. They are too common. And usually sent by the same brands, again and again.

This campaign was different, however. It was intended for the late hour, a day that no one ever celebrates. In fact, all you usually do is sleep.

And that's exactly what the brand offers: you sleep in it, but you can buy a mattress at home, of course.

The overall design of e-mail, the subject line ("This extra hour, though."), The animated GIF format, a short copy and a clear CTA: everything goes perfectly.

The only thing I would change is the value of the discount. If you follow Casper's emails, you will see that their discounts are still 10%.

I understand the strategy, but you become blind to this kind of discount if you keep seeing it.

7. American Express

What:

E-mail promoting a live chat to get help for your Amex account.

Subject: Have a question? Get an answer via chat

Why:

The campaign is a win-win situation.

While many banks seem to be trying to prevent customers from contacting them, Amex is doing exactly the opposite. Actively promote and remind their members live chat. Invite customers to ask them questions. You feel good about being a member.

In an email, they were helpful and gently reminded us of the benefit of joining the Amex.

Brands that do not have a steady stream of new products and offers may find it hard to say anything interesting. Amex has found a good way to solve this problem.

The design quickly boils down to the subject of the title and a clear advantage of the live chat – "Get a quick answer".

The real-time discussion window example gives context, which allows you to get the message even after a summary reading.

The final part of the win-win is that live chat is probably better for Amex too. The cost of live chat support is probably lower than that of telephone support.

A campaign that benefits both the brand and the customer.

Tim Watson, Zettasphere

8. Mixmax

What:

The user has integrated emails with tips in the form of GIF.

Why:

I was a new Mixmax user and I did not know all their features.

Every three days, they let me know how to better use their software.

In this way, I was not overwhelmed by their software and I adopted the product very easily. E-mails have also broadened my knowledge of how to write good e-mails.

I'm now using the same tactic at Userpilot.

Aazar Ali Shad, head of growth at Userpilot.com

9. Smart Blogger

What:

This was an email message sent to encourage subscribers to read a case study that served as premium content to a paid course.

Why:

Here's why this email is compelling.

First, he exploits the power of social proof in the line of object and the line of opening.

Who would not want to look at a message that has attracted more than a million visitors?

Second, he uses the emotional trigger difficult to resist from "freedom".

Finally, it goes straight to the point, what people appreciate in a crazy world.

Qhubekani Nyathi, Long-Term Content Strategist at Wholesome Commerce

11. Mejuri

What:

This is a B2C flash e-mail for Black Friday from last year, giving newsletter subscribers exclusive and anticipated access to their sale once a year.

Why:

First and foremost, we all know how much our inbox is cluttered with Black Friday.

Mejuri chose to keep their emails simple and accurate, which we can all understand.

The e-mail also emphasizes the exclusivity of this invitation. The words "only for sale all year" in the subject, as well as "private" and "secret" are powerful motivators – supported by the fact that this invitation is only addressed to subscribers to the newsletter.

The limited amount of time (until midnight today) and the idea of ​​scarcity (Mejuri is known for his lack of popular parts) prompt the need to act now .

I followed their social networks and their newsletter for a few weeks. This was the trigger I needed to finally buy them.

Bronwyn Kienapple, Content Marketing Manager at Venngage

12. Product hunting

What:

A daily digest of products featured in Product Hunt.

Subject: This is good for the stomach. Yuck.

Why:

The object line m has totally hung. Whenever I see "Yikes" in my inbox, I open it. And the content did not disappoint me once I opened it. The tone of the conversation and the description of the product presented made the reading enjoyable.

Their description of the product and the inclusion of comments (frightened) from the publication then convinced me to click on the list on their site, and then on the product itself. It was a perfect combination of a selected product well chosen, an attractive subject line and an easy to read copy.

Abby Hehemann, Product Marketing Manager at GetResponse

13. Evidence

What:

This is a follow-up email sent to people who registered for a webinar that did not show up for the live event. Our webinar covered the 5 growth strategies we learned during our stay at Y Combinator in 2018

Why:

This e-mail works well for us because it is sent to an audience already registered for a webinar. We know that they have a great intention of viewing this content – because they have already taken the time of their time to submit their information in a main form.

At the same time, we know how much day-to-day work can be done for traders and entrepreneurs. Rather than blocking them from getting the webinar content because they did not show live, we record our live presentation and follow up with an e-mail giving them a second chance to see.

In the body of the e-mail, we provide several links to our content and we repeat the topic of the training several times. We also strive to take advantage of the names of major technology companies (Airbnb, Dropbox, Gusto) to add credibility to our presentation.

Finally, we generate the FOMO saying "trust me, you will not want to miss this opportunity" at our final signing.

Ben Johnson, Content Strategist, Evidence

13. Hackers of Growth

What:

Email campaign referring to real-time events – the Oscars.

Why:

This is an interesting example.

And it's not just because he uses an animated GIF. This is what the GIF tells us and the copy that surrounds it.

This e-mail campaign is about the Oscars, which may not be so unusual the week of the 91st Academy Awards.

What is interesting is the angle taken by Growth Hackers in this email. They do not talk about movies or music that have been recognized. Instead, they talk about the real "winner" of the Oscars – diversity.

As you can read in their article, which also provides an explanation to their GIF, the 91st Academy Awards broke the record of female and African-American winners.

Keeping this in mind, they decided to dedicate this e-mail to diversity as well and have prepared a selection of the best possible content to celebrate this important topic.

For someone who cares about these values ​​and who did not actually follow the Oscars night, this email was very inspiring and informative.

Something you do not see often in your inbox.

14. Rothy's

What:

This is a promotional email sent to people who have chosen Rothy's marketing but have not yet purchased.

Why:

There are at least three reasons why this email stands out.

First of all, it's not just about animating a video at the top, the body of GIF exploits people's default responses to SMS or direct messages: namely, we can not resist the temptation to read them .

Secondly, it uses real names, authentic conversation elements and even images (eg, the cat) that give the impression of being listening (or listening) the texts of someone else.

Third, it subtly exploits one of the most powerful persuasive tools: social proof.

I know all this is true because I did not receive this email.

Instead, my lovely wife forwarded it to me and immediately texted me: "I just sent you an email from Rothy's. I have never seen anything like it before. "

She is a lady who loves cats and who has just turned 30 years old. Talk about nailing your target demographic. (And yes, later in the day, she and I ordered her first pair.)

Aaron Orendorff, founder and content strategist, iconiContent

15. Capterra

What:

A regular newsletter but intended to warm "sleepy" devotees.

Why:

First of all, his catchy subject line: personalized and intriguing. I could not help but open it to find out WHY I am the best. What did I do to become the best, since I am not an active user of Capterra?

Secondly, the structure: brief, clear, consistent with the rule "a mail – a CTA" and focused on the value I would gain. I was quick to understand that it was not spam or its content.

Finally, the most interesting reason is the sending of this offer: the national day of the compliment. As a general rule, marketers ignore this tedious holiday and focus on the big five (Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine's Day and Easter); but using small but cute calendar days could bring benefits. Content ideas for newsletters, at a minimum.

Lesley Vos, content strategist at Bid4Papers

If you like this idea, be sure to check out our infographic "Holiday Calendar" and discover smaller calendar days that can inspire great campaigns :).

16. UpLead

What:

A cold email to interview influencers.

Why:

Customization: the email is highly personalized
Relevant: it mentions a recent interview that they did on a podcast
Gives value: This gives value by mentioning the size of the audience (20,000)
Ego strokes: it hits their ego a bit ("successful leaders like you")
Fast: The interview is a simple Google Docs interview, without it being necessary to schedule time in the agenda.
A simple CTA: Every e-mail should have an easy answer to terminate the CTA (Success! – He replied with "It looks cool – I'm in it!")

Will Cannon, founder and CEO of UpLead

17. Zest

What:

A confirmation email is sent after you have sent content to Zest.

Why:

Fun and engaging: the email is different and sets the tone of the brand
Relevant: it mentions the recently published article
Fast: The email is straight to the point and on the spot. Still, this confirms that my suggestion has been taken into account and I love it.
A simple CTA: Although I await their return, he suggests me to add and empower the community.

Baptiste Debever, co-founder and head of growth at Feedier

18. Hello Bar

What:

The email contains free tips on how to collect more emails to expand your list of email addresses from subscribers.

Why:

Email was very powerful because it scares us of the challenges we face as we try to expand our list of email subscribers. It offers practical advice to implement immediately. By giving a little insight, not abandoning the farm and using a powerful call for action, they made me curious to book a place at the training to learn more tips.

Paul Granger, Content Marketing Manager, Website Promoter

19. Simyo

What:

Triggered an e-mail from an old telephone company (Spanish company) after requesting the migration of a phone number to a new one.

Why:

When you decide to change your telephone service, you expect:

1) being bombarded with offers, promises and gifts;

2) Hell of paperwork.

The very catchy subject line (adaptation of a popular song, which probably only concerns that of my generation) + the friendly and informal tone of the voice alleviate these fears.

The reassuring content, thanking me for their work and saying that they do not harass / try to overload me, led me to wonder if I had taken the right call (and it would be so easy to change again next time).

Angel Lorente Paramo, Former Global Head of Emarketing at Qatar Airways

20. Cards Against Humanity

What:

Campaign "The Cards Against Humanity" Black Friday

Why:

Here is an example of an oldie but goodie email campaign.

As a fan of Cards Against Humanity, I expect nothing less than an unusually sarcastic, cynical or at least unusual communication.

What's more unusual than an electronic trademark stating that it is closing its online store for Black Friday?

They even ask you to give money for no valid reason (via a CTA button totally opposed to the best practices in terms of email design).

Tracking this campaign was also fun. It turned out that they received a total of $ 71,145 for absolutely nothing. And they even listed the kind of fun things for which they decided to spend that money.

You can read more about this campaign on their website.

Since then, I have been waiting impatiently for their e-mails from Black Friday and I'm never disappointed.

21. Aboriginal

What:
Customer feedback email after purchase

Why:

I received this product satisfaction e-mail a few days after ordering a pair of boots from Native Shoes.

Although this type of email should be an industry standard, few e-commerce sites actually do it, let alone do it the right way.

This email verifies all the most important details:

Highly visible company logo
Customizing the customer name
The name and image of the purchased product
Ability to write the criticism directly in the same email. It's a lot easier than navigating the site.
Detailed exam options: stars, text box and size adjustment. Note that the 5 star option is preselected.
Big call button to the action at the end
A touch of humor to make things lighter

From my point of view, it's a great way to gather reviews for ecommerce stores. Maybe the only thing missing in this email is an incentive. Customers would be much more likely to write reviews if they were offered a discount on their next purchase or something similar.

Radu Vrabie, full-stack digital marketing specialist at Guaranteed.software

22. Revolute

What

Promotional Offer of the Black Friday Email Campaign

Why:

Every element of this email campaign says it's something exclusive:

The dark theme of e-mail with very contrasting white fonts.
The pink gold card turning in the GIF.
The call button to pink action eye-catching.

And finally, the copy, which indicates that they do not normally take the Black Friday train, but that more than 9,000 requests from their users can not be ignored by Revolut.

E-mail is extremely simple and very clear – the main benefits are highlighted in a bulleted list, then the monetary value is reformulated just above the CTA button.

This is completely different from their usual newsletters and automated emails.

As a customer, I knew immediately that this offer was special and deserved to be verified.

Marcin Struzik, video manager at GetResponse

23. Reservation

What:

Conversion des utilisateurs ayant recherché un hébergement dans une ville spécifique et n’ayant pas effectué de réservation.

Pourquoi:

Cette campagne de marketing par courriel est un bon exemple pour toute entreprise opérant en ligne.

J'ai reçu cet e-mail car j'ai donné mon accord pour recevoir du contenu marketing et parce qu'un jour, j'étais en train de vérifier de manière informelle des endroits où séjourner à Berlin sur Booking.com.

Je naviguais sans intention d’acheter, mais après avoir été rappelé au voyage, l’idée de le garder ne disparaît pas.

En dehors de cela, cette campagne de courrier électronique est un bon exemple de personnalisation: je pouvais voir mon nom sur la bannière, et ils ne l'ont pas gâté avec Dear [Name]qui a parfois fière allure quand beaucoup d'autres entreprises le font. .

En outre, les dates qui m'intéressaient étaient déjà complétées, ce qui raccourcit également le processus d'achat éventuel.

Bien que certaines personnes puissent trouver cela effrayant – Booking mentionne explicitement qu’elles suivent en ligne les activités des utilisateurs.

Margo Burkivska, spécialiste en marketing B2B chez GetResponse

24. MeUndies

Quoi:

Courriel promotionnel présentant une nouvelle ligne de produits.

Pourquoi:

Cet email est si ludique.

Les sous-vêtements sont quelque chose que les gens cachent et dont ils ne veulent pas parler.

Pour en faire la promotion, vous pouvez soit être timide – hé, je ne veux pas vous déranger, mais si vous recherchez une culotte… c'est ce que nous faisons – ou être fort et fier des produits que vous 'offrez.

MeUndies fait le dernier. Avec cet email superbement animé, ils montrent à quel point leurs produits sont colorés et ludiques.

Dans cet e-mail, vous pouvez vous amuser avec vos produits, que vous décidiez de sortir un sushi avec un ami ou de voler en solo.

Je l'aime.

25. Soins / de

Quoi:

Campagne d'email présentant un nouveau produit

Pourquoi:

Voici un excellent exemple de promotion par courrier électronique simple mais informative.

J'apprécie la combinaison d'un beau design et d'une superbe copie.

Après la brève introduction, vous apprendrez quelques informations de base sur le trio de champignons qui renforcent le système immunitaire.

Le segment suivant vous indique où il a poussé et pourquoi c'est important.

Vient ensuite le dernier segment invitant les abonnés à répondre au questionnaire pour les aider à choisir le bon produit pour leurs besoins.

Et il n’ya qu’un seul appel à l’action – j’adore ce genre de courriels.

Irek Klimczak, expert en marketing de contenu chez GetResponse

26. Géant américain

Quoi:

Campagne d'email invitant les abonnés au magasin de détail

Pourquoi:

Ce courriel contient des informations sur la fenêtre contextuelle de New York. C’est une excellente idée d’utiliser le marketing par courriel pour inviter les abonnés à votre emplacement physique.

Faites savoir à vos clients potentiels que vous êtes présent et qu’ils peuvent essayer vos produits.

Profitez au maximum de l'expérience en ligne et hors ligne.

C’est la façon de le faire.

Irek Klimczak, expert en marketing de contenu chez GetResponse

27. Trello

Quoi:

Email expliquant comment utiliser Trello

Objet: Un suiveur d'habitudes personnelles gratuit pour vous

Pourquoi:

J'adore les courriels de Trello, car ils sont très utiles et fournissent des exemples concrets d'utilisation de la solution.

Après avoir reçu cet email, j'ai fini par créer deux nouvelles cartes Trello. Je suppose donc que l'e-mail a atteint son objectif.

En quoi est-ce si bon?

Un CTA clair sur un article de blog détaillé avec des captures d’écran et des cas d’utilisation utiles.
Des graphismes cohérents et amusants qui correspondent à l'apparence du produit.
Une rédaction amusante en ligne avec la marque.
Adresses personnelles de l'utilisateur – Trello est principalement utilisé pour la gestion de projet et la procrastination est un défi courant auquel sont confrontés les projets.

Marta Kusinska, responsable du marketing par e-mail chez GetResponse

28. Aaron Krall

Quoi:

E-mail annonçant une offre spéciale: convertir les contacts de messagerie en clients

Objet: Si votre prix est inférieur à 10 USD…

Pourquoi:

C’est un courriel surprenant qui a atterri dans ma boîte de réception, et je pense que cela mérite d’être noté.

With a great intro, including some personal details of the sender, this email gives you an impression of coming from a friend.

So the main aim is building trust, also by using some numbers and social proof in the body of an email.

After all, you’re to trust Aaron with your money and need to believe that he’s a suitable person to help your Saas business grow.

And get curious enough to ask about his special offer.

Marta Kusinska, Email Marketing Manager at GetResponse

29. Carnival Cruise Line

What:

Promotional email campaign

Why:

The email by Carnival Cruise Line is a sheer delight for the subscribers, with its creative presentation. They have followed all the email marketing best practices and created a visually impressive design that is sure to kindle wanderlust in the subscriber’s mind.

The subject line: Deposits are taking a dive. (See what they find down there!) along with the preheader text: Get reduced deposits starting from $50 per person for sailings through December 2020 are interesting enough to capture the attention of the subscribers and make them open the email.

The header image and text are crafted in such a way that the recipients are compelled to scroll through the entire email.

Finally, when they reach the bottom of the email, the sea floor with beautiful fishes usher them in. (Animation couldn’t have been used better.)  

The email ends with a clear CTA “Search All Cruises”.

All in all, it sets a great example of how travel industry emails should be. Inspired already?

Kevin George, Head of Marketing at EmailMonks

30. Phrasee

 

 

What:
Email sharing the latest content from Phrasee blog and other places on the Internet.

Subject line: Is it hot in this inbox, or is it just you? 😍

 

Why:

I always look forward to Phrasee’s content emails. I love their tone of voice and love how – as a B2B tech company with a really serious product used by huge brands – they stand out from other brands in the space just by the way the speak to their audience. Because, hey, marketers just wanna have fun, too! Couple that with gifs and a very specific type of humor – and it’s a perfect Thursday read.

They’re also great at what a lot of emails keep missing – which is creating meaningful preheaders that go together with the subject lines. I always feel like the subject line + preheader duo is so underrated (and too many companies don’t ever go beyond “Read this email online” in their preheader), while it can be a great open rate booster.

Plus, I find it awkwardly satisfying to find a pickup line in my inbox sent by a brand I actually like!

Karolina Kurcwald, Chief Wordsmith at GetResponse

31. Litmus

What:

Email invite to a conference.

Why:

This one is a no brainer.

What’s the best way to get people to get excited about your email design conference?

Show them an amazing email invite that’s using coding tricks you haven’t experienced before.

And that’s exactly what Litmus does with their email invitations.

One time, they added animated videos in the message background. The next year they’ve added a live Twitter feed showing peoples’ reactions to their campaign.

This email is among the best ones I’ve ever seen being deployed on a larger scale.

Feeling inspired?

If you’ve scrolled down this far, that means you saw over 30 great marketing email examples.

You’ve probably noticed some interesting:

maSome of them had great copy, others were all about the design, and then there were those that were just entertaining.

In other words, there’s no one way to make a great email marketing campaign.

It pays off to follow the best practices, but without talking to your audience and checking your analytics reports, you won’t know for sure if a campaign was successful.

So, what’s the next step you’ll take?

My recommendation is that you start designing your email campaigns, A/B test them, and keep optimizing them to achieve the best possible results.

And if you didn’t know that yet, GetResponse can help you with all of that.

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